November book launches – come along!

I have two events coming up in November, both in honour of new books. Drop in and say hi if you’re free…

Clown Wars book launch

My friends Simon and Tim at the Big Green Bookshop have made the foolish schoolboy error of allowing Jeremy Drysdale and I to have a secret clown party on their premises. Except it’s not a secret and no clowns are allowed – see below.

Making of that what you will, do join us for tea, sandwiches and custard pies on the evening of 17th November from 7pm onwards. We will read a passage or two from the book, discuss your concerns about the current spate of clown profiling and mingle a bit too.

Signed copies, as you’d expect, but stocks of the physical books are limited.

The Veil book launch

A few days later, on 26th Nov, I’ll be at Sledgelit in Derby with the owner/editor of Horrific Tales Publishing, Graeme Reynolds. We’ll be launching the limited edition hardback of The Veil (ebook and audio versions also available).

There’ll be lots of other cool stuff going on at Sledgelit and many of your favourite genre authors will be there too. Come and see us!

Clown Wars – Official Statement

In the light of recent events concerning incidents of stalking, threats of assault, harassment, breach of the peace and other nuisance-making – all allegedly perpetrated by people dressed as clowns – the authors of Clown Wars: Blood & Aspic wish to make the following statement:

“We do not condone, nor have we ever, clown impersonators and/or clown-associated accoutrements, disguises or paraphernalia for the purpose of causing intimidation, harm or unrest. Nor do we find the global spate of such ‘attacks’ in any way amusing.

Clown Wars: Blood & Aspic is a work of pure fiction written, like any other novel, as entertainment. It was never intended to inspire idiots to dress up as clowns and run around terrifying innocent people.

We now feel it is time to distance ourselves from any and all such activities by saying loud and clear: this has nothing whatsoever to do with us.

This is our final comment on the matter and we do not wish to hear from reporters – or members of the public pretending to be ‘real’ clowns. Nor will we field any further complaints about the contents of the book. None of this is our responsibility. It’s just a story.”

Joseph D’Lacey and Jeremy Drysdale
Oct 10th, 2016

NB: All comments will be strictly moderated.

Traditional publishing vs self publishing: some thoughts and an interview with Jeremy Thompson, MD of Troubador Publishing Ltd

The publisher I’m using for The Hairy Faerie is Matador – an imprint of Troubador Publishing Ltd.

As you probably know, this is the first time I’ve ever self-published and I wasn’t keen to do it.

However, because I read The Hairy Faerie aloud at school assemblies and writing workshops, I wanted a ‘real’ book; something children could take home and enjoy. Waiting the ‘traditional’ amount of time for publishers to get back to me meant I was missing opportunities to take the book into schools.

So, I decided to do this title myself.

I’ve taken a lot of advice from some very experienced people, already running their own indie houses and imprints. I looked into Kindle, Lightning Source and Ingram Spark. None of them offered exactly what I wanted – even though I wasn’t sure what that was, at first – and all of them had negative legal and taxation aspects that were off-putting.

In the end, a personal recommendation from someone who freelanced for Troubador Publishing
caused me to investigate. And now, here I am, reading proofs of The Hairy Faerie with publication just around the corner.

It struck me that the best person to explain some of the pros and cons of traditional and self-publishing was the Managing Director of Troubador – Jeremy Thompson – a man with vast experience in both fields.

I got in touch with a few questions and this was the result: Continue reading